OHS and Climate Change Reply

Many of my OHS colleagues have responsibility for environmental safety, some to the extent of being rebadged HSE or OHSE. I have been an ardent advocate of managing business safety and risk issues in a coordinated and integrated manner. Historically, I would have applied the risk management standard as the umbrella framework, others do not. More…

Is OHS a Joke? 3

Recently, occupational health and safety (OHS) has been given a “bad press” in the electronic media in Australia with many examples of how an activity or behaviour has been stopped or excluded on the “unreasonable” grounds of OHS. More…

Drug use in transport workplaces Reply

There is a continuing and contentious parallel between road safety and occupational safety. OHS specialists are worsening this problem by trying to illustrate OHS issues in relation to road safety because road safety is seen to be more easily understandable by the public.

But this approach confuses the public more than enlightens, and it also puts workplace safety in a difficult context More…

OHS, Shareholders & Work/Life Balance 1

I have always believed that safety practitioners in one country can learn much about safety management from the activities and events in other countries. Often it is possible to anticipate hazards by being able to look over our factory fences or national borders.

The increased risk of terrorist attack and the concerns over bird flu or H5N1 have changed our perception of workplace safety risks. During my studies we took an airplane crash as the extreme example of a high risk low probability event. That criteria has undergone some re-evaluation. More…

A “Fortean” Approach to Safety Management Reply

The open mind approach to the investigation of anything is a core element in accident investigation, brainstorming, “what-if” analysis, and ultimately occupational health and safety. OHS has been saddled for decades by expert investigation from isolated silos. And I am not sure that being an expert in one discipline requires one to be ignorant of other disciplines, or even disparaging of other disciplines. Experts in engineering must acknowledge that there are things that happen that are unexpected, that a machine was not designed for. More…